Enermax launches REVOLUTION DUO dual-fan PSU range

by Mark Tyson on 5 October 2016, 15:01

Tags: Enermax (8093.TWO)

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Taiwan's Enermax has just launched its new REVOLUTION DUO Power Supply range. It has created three of these new dual-fan PSUs rated at 500W, 600W, and 700W and they are all 80 Plus GOLD rated for efficiency. The new PSUs use a pair of patented Enermax Twister Bearing fans in a DUOFlow configuration to help shift air and keep your PSU running cool for long-term stability.

Enermax says the return to dual-fan PSU designs was deemed a necessity due to the increased demand of PSU shroud cases. Such cases are great for cable management, and for a neat and clean build, says Enermax, but they stifle air flow though the PSU compartment. Thus the DUOFlow design was formulated. DUOFlow is said to be a quieter solution than a single fan PSU as the fan pairing can rotate more slowly.

DUOFlow PSU cooling combines an 8cm and a 10cm fan to draw air into the PSU body and expel it, creating ample air flow over the heat generating components within. As mentioned in the intro, Enermax employs its patented Twister Bearing fans. It also leverages its patented FMA (Fan-speed Manual Adjustment) function to provide optimal cooling upon user demand. The default FMA setting adjusts the speed of the pair of fans depending upon the measured thermals. Users can boost air flow in chassis without a PSU shroud by switching the orientation of their REVOUTION DUO, as pictured below.

Enermax REVOLUTION DUO dual-fan PSUs are 80 Plus GOLD certified and provide 87-92 per cent high efficiency performance at 20-100 per cent load. Being 2013 ErP Lot 6 ready, these new PSUs consume under 0.5W in standby mode and use high efficiency +5Vsb circuitry (when combined with a compatible motherboard).

The new PSUs provide stable output with multiple safeguards including OVP, UVP, OPP, OCP (+3.3V/+5V), SCP & SIP.



HEXUS Forums :: 11 Comments

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Wow old skool, takes me back to the PSU's of the late 2000's
This makes absolutely no sense. At all.

First of all: unless both fans are intakes (with somewhere for the air to exhaust), two fans do not in any way increase airflow. They increase static pressure, so air might flow better through densely packed components (which is the argument for push-pull setups on radiators), but airflow will always be limited by the amount of air taken in by the intake fan. And with a 100mm intake fan, that PSU looks pretty weak.

Secondly: How on earth does this affect cases with PSU shrouds? It has exactly the same airflow pattern as every other PSU on the market (as it needs to to be ATX compliant …). It takes in air from the bottom, and exhausts it out the back. Sure, some PSUs have holes and openings allowing some air to spill inside the case. But those are few and far between - and it really doesn't matter. The majority of airflow is bottom-to-back, no matter the (ATX) PSU. This is no different.

Third: The use of two fans allowing them to run at lower RPMs. See point one. Also, the fans are (much) smaller than competing units, and thus have to run at higher speeds to compensate. Not to mention that noise adds up. Two noise sources at the same dB(A) level next to each other add up to roughly 3 dB(A) more than either.

Fourth: “cases with PSU shrouds stifle air flow through the PSU compartment.” And so what? What does it matter if you have airflow past the closed-off sides of your PSU? Not one iota. Even if your PSU has components mounted on the bottom of the PCB, using the casing for heat dissipation, this doesn't matter. Sorry, Enermax.

Fifth: The addition of a fan speed control knob is a dead giveaway. It pretty much says “you can have a hot, silent(ish) PSU, or a loud, cool one. Your choice. With this design, there is no automated ‘best of both worlds’ setting, like 99% of PSUs. Sorry.”


Sixth: Where on earth is the journalism here? Shouldn't journalists actually question the veracity of claims like this? This is just PR-BS regurgitation. Seriously. You're supposed to be experts. You get paid to write about this. Stop being mindless markething shills.
Valantar
This makes absolutely no sense. At all.

First of all: unless both fans are intakes (with somewhere for the air to exhaust), two fans do not in any way increase airflow. They increase static pressure, so air might flow better through densely packed components (which is the argument for push-pull setups on radiators), but airflow will always be limited by the amount of air taken in by the intake fan. And with a 100mm intake fan, that PSU looks pretty weak.

Secondly: How on earth does this affect cases with PSU shrouds? It has exactly the same airflow pattern as every other PSU on the market (as it needs to to be ATX compliant …). It takes in air from the bottom, and exhausts it out the back. Sure, some PSUs have holes and openings allowing some air to spill inside the case. But those are few and far between - and it really doesn't matter. The majority of airflow is bottom-to-back, no matter the (ATX) PSU. This is no different.

Third: The use of two fans allowing them to run at lower RPMs. See point one. Also, the fans are (much) smaller than competing units, and thus have to run at higher speeds to compensate. Not to mention that noise adds up. Two noise sources at the same dB(A) level next to each other add up to roughly 3 dB(A) more than either.

Fourth: “cases with PSU shrouds stifle air flow through the PSU compartment.” And so what? What does it matter if you have airflow past the closed-off sides of your PSU? Not one iota. Even if your PSU has components mounted on the bottom of the PCB, using the casing for heat dissipation, this doesn't matter. Sorry, Enermax.

Fifth: The addition of a fan speed control knob is a dead giveaway. It pretty much says “you can have a hot, silent(ish) PSU, or a loud, cool one. Your choice. With this design, there is no automated ‘best of both worlds’ setting, like 99% of PSUs. Sorry.”


Sixth: Where on earth is the journalism here? Shouldn't journalists actually question the veracity of claims like this? This is just PR-BS regurgitation. Seriously. You're supposed to be experts. You get paid to write about this. Stop being mindless markething shills.

At one point you are not right, yes two fans contributes to better airflow, airflow is the volume of air moved in a time unit, but if you have one fan you put lots of air inside but a lot fewer gets out (Exactly this is airflow, the volume of air that gets in and out, not just in or out).
I had an old Enermax with 2 fans in it, Galaxy 850w iirc!
It still ticks along in the father in laws PC.
Raven74
At one point you are not right, yes two fans contributes to better airflow, airflow is the volume of air moved in a time unit, but if you have one fan you put lots of air inside but a lot fewer gets out (Exactly this is airflow, the volume of air that gets in and out, not just in or out).

No, no, no. Airflow for a PSU is the amount of air flowing /through/ the PSU. Sure, two fans next to each other each provide airflow, and might as such be added to each other. But never when these are connected in series, one delivering air to the other. In a case like that, the second fan will only ever be able to move air provided by the first fan, and as such can only tangentially affecr actual airflow in the system. What you're describing is resistance to airflow causing pressure buildup. No matter the density of the PSU dedign, it won't realistically affect pressurization in any meaningful way, simply because PSUs have large openings for airflow. Whatever pressure potential there is will dissipate through the openings. Also, even if pressure buildup was to somehow happen, it would level out as soon as the fan hit its designated speed, at which time airflow through the system would be equal to what the fan can provide at that level of resistance. A second fan can lower this resistance, effectively increasing static pressure of the fan system, but airflow will still never exceed what the intake fan can provide.

At best, enermax is solving a “problem” they have created for themselves by giving the PSU ridiculously small fans and too small exhaust vents on the back. Unless, of course, the internal layout of the PSU is so horrendously bad as to actually require a push-pull fan setup.